M.E.G.'s Confessional

My Mystery Disease is Pompe

Extreme Makeover: Stateroom Edition

on January 1, 2013

 

Leanna and I in the Bahamas with a classic (Magic) and new (Dream) ship. May 2012.

Leanna and I in the Bahamas with a classic (Magic) and new (Dream) ship. May 2012.

Sailing on the Disney cruise ships in non-accessible rooms used to be a cause of concern for me. Used to. Being the clever person you have come to know and love, I of course figured out a way to make (most) non-accessible staterooms on both the classic and new ships work for me. Of course, a true accessible room is always best, but they are not always available. Disney used to do a really good job of  holding accessible rooms back for passengers who really need them, but now it seems anyone can easily book one. Whether they need one or not. I’ve seen people who claimed to need a walk/roll in shower because they can’t climb in and out of a bathtub, but seem to have no trouble climbing in and out of the hot tubs on the pool deck. I know people request the rooms simply because they are larger, so I had to get creative with non-accessible rooms when none are available.

 

Roll in shower in an accessible cabin. There is a fold down bench, grab bars, a hand held shower head, and best of all nothing to climb over.

Roll in shower in an accessible cabin. There is a fold down bench, grab bars, a hand held shower head, and best of all nothing to climb over.

The Classic Ships: The Magic and The Wonder

I spent two weeks on the Disney Wonder in a non-accessible room, so I figure I can make just about anything work – one way or another. There is always the option of using the facilities in the Fitness Center should I not be able to create an environment suitable to my needs. The Fitness Centers on all the ships have  very nice walk/roll in showers.

 

On the Magic and Wonder, the main bed splits into two twin beds upon request. Brilliant.  This offers more flexibility for anyone, special needs or not. We had our stateroom host remove one of the twin beds and slide the remaining bed against the wall – lengthwise. This gave me plenty of room to bring my mobility scooter in, turn it around, and of course charge it at night. I brought along my own portable grab bar. These can be found in just about any mobility shop. I’ve also seen them in Target. I used the grab bar in the shower, and not only did I use it, but everyone in my travel party used it. We felt it offered more stability than the permanent grab bars. Crossing the Pacific Ocean was a bit bouncy and the grab bar worked great for all of us. Disney Cruise Line provided a raised toilet seat to complete our transformation into an accessible stateroom.

 

The New Ships: The Dream and The Fantasy

The first time I sailed on one of the newer ships was last year on the Fantasy. We  managed to obtain an accessible verandah room. On the classic ships, the accessible verandah rooms are all located at the back of the boat and have a white wall verandah. This doesn’t bother me, but some people prefer the plexi-glass verandah walls so they can see the water without having to stand up and peer over the verandah wall. On the newer ships, accessible verandah rooms are located all over the ship, the front, middle, and back. Our room was located midship and had a plexi-glass verandah. I’ll admit the plexi-glass is nice, but not having is certainly not a deal breaker for me. In my opinion, the biggest advantage the accessible cabins on the new ships are the automatic doors. To enter your cabin you simply tap your card against the RFID reader and your door opens, stays open long enough for a wheelchair user to enter and get out of the way, and then closes. There is a button on the inside of the cabin that you press when you are ready to leave. Non-wheelchair users have complained about the “nuisance” of having to wait for the slow moving to door to completely close before they can leave.

 

This is what I used to create "steps" to use in the non-accessible cabin.

This is what I used to create “steps” to use in the non-accessible cabin.

Recently, I stayed in a non-accessible verandah room on the Dream. There were only two of us in the room, so again, we made it work. Since the beds on the new ships do not split apart it was a bit more challenging than when I was on the Wonder. Our room was a “Family” stateroom, meaning it had a round bathtub instead of a rectangle one. This geometric difference made it possible for me to bring my mobility scooter into the cabin. The round shape of the tub, which was reflected in the wall next to the bed offered just enough room for me to squeeze in. This would not be possible in the rooms without a round tub. Speaking of the round tub, while it offered an advantage regarding bringing my scooter into the room, it simultaneously presented a new challenge. The round tub was higher and much more difficult to climb in and out of than the rectangle tubs. We solved this problem by utilizing my portable grab bar again, and bringing my own “adjustable steps.” Not knowing exactly how high I would need my “steps” to be, I needed something that could be adjusted and wouldn’t become a slipping hazard. I scanned the aisles of the hardware store for something and what I ended up with was floor mats designed for children. They are ABC/123 interlocking floor mats and they worked really well. I ended up stacking 7 of them together and secured them with a luggage strap. They are light and easy to transport, but they can take up a bit of luggage space. Disney provided a raised toilet seat again and the transformation into a semi-accessible cabin was complete. The biggest obstacle in this room was getting out. Since the beds on new ships don’t split apart, I didn’t have enough room to turn my scooter around. I had to CAREFULLY back up – there was little room for error in the narrow hallway leading from the bed to the door (the regular stateroom doorways are 25.5 inches wide). My friend had to open the door and then help me navigate backing out, with practice we got better and faster at exiting the room. I could not leave the room unless my friend was with me, thankfully she was always there to help me. I’m sure in a pinch I could call Guest Services and they would deploy someone, probably my room steward, to open the door and help guide me out.

 

Location, location, location.

Some people believe the best location is mid-ship, the cruise lines fuel these fairy tales by charging more for what they deem more desirable locations. The “theory” they peddle is the midship rooms will experience less movement. I’ve been on different decks and different locations and have not noticed any difference in the rocking. I believe it is merely a ploy to extort more money. For wheelchair users, the best location is going to be near an elevator. The hallways are narrow, filled with housekeeping carts, and other guests going to and from their rooms. Additionally, if your scooter is too large to fit through your stateroom door, you’ll probably need to park it in the elevator lobby. There are electrical outlets in the lobbies, so you can charge your scooter.

 

Accessible rooms are indeed best for me, but if none are available I’m not going to let that keep me from cruising with Mickey and Captain Jack.

 

My friend Lonnie and I on Pirate Night. December 2012 on the Disney Dream. Oh, and that's our friend Donald Duck in the center.

My friend Lonnie and I on Pirate Night. December 2012 on the Disney Dream. Oh, and that’s our friend Donald Duck in the center.

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3 responses to “Extreme Makeover: Stateroom Edition

  1. Ralph says:

    Hi, It is inspiring to read about your story. I’m really interested because I’ve run the gamut of diagnoses, from probable ALS to motor neuron disease and now to post-polio syndrome. I was immunized for polio, but find it hard to believe I may have had polio prior to being immunized or that the immunization itself may have caused polio. So, I’m wondering if I have late-onset pompe disease? I had some genetic testing but it wasn’t for the main one considered for pompe disease I think. I have weakness and muscle atrophy in both legs, fatigue easily, and hearing impaired, muscle tremors, almost apnea, blah, blah, blah! I use a cane sometimes when it’s really bad. Depression.

    Does it cost much to do a genetic test?

    Have a good one, and thanks so much for your blog and article!

    Ralph

    • purplelv93 says:

      Hi Ralph!

      There are so many debilitative diseases that mimic one another, it can be difficult to get a definitive diagnosis. The test for Pompe disease, I believe, is a less than $300, but most insurance companies will cover it. It is a simple blood test. Where do you live? If you live in the United States, the Muscular Dystrophy Association can help with the costs of the test. I’ve helped patients in other countries get tested too, so anything is possible. It is such a simple test, it is best to either confirm or rule out Pompe early on in your quest to discover the truth. Please let me know what I can do to assist you.

      Monique (MEG)

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