M.E.G.'s Confessional

My Mystery Disease is Pompe

Accessible Travel: DCL The Fantasy

on June 3, 2012

After spending hours and hours planning a trip to London and Paris, I ended up taking two Disney cruises instead. Why? It was much easier and cheaper. The more planning I did the more the price tag increased, that coupled with the fact that London is hosting the Olympics this year made the decision to change plans very easy. I have been in cities before and during the Olympics and they are a mess! Everything is ridiculously crowded and over priced, I’m not sure what I was thinking. And now, as I sit here watching the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee and the mobs of people, I’m even more convinced it was a great decision to avoid the chaos of London during a major event. Now, visiting a city after the Olympics is a whole other story….a story I hope to be able to tell you about in the next year or so.

Back to accessible cruising….I wrote about how accessible Disney cruises are HERE. However, after cruising on their newest ship, the Fantasy, I felt the need to share some updates.

One of the issues I had on both the Wonder and Magic were some of the public thresholds. A couple of them were too steep and my scooter would get stuck. I didn’t encounter any problem thresholds on the Fantasy. However, there was a small lip in the threshold leading into my accessible stateroom. I didn’t get stuck, but had to take the door with a little bit more speed and at just the right angle. My stateroom had enough room to maneuver my scooter, a roll in shower, plenty of grab rails, and even an accessible verandah. A fantastic improvement on the accessible staterooms is their self-opening doors. You just swipe your room key card and the door opens…..like magic!

The lifts are also bigger, as the ship is bigger and holds more people it doesn’t really make catching one during busy times any easier. However some are big enough so if I was in one alone I could actually turn my scooter around.

The two main theaters have additional wheelchair viewing areas, opening up the option of sitting somewhere other than the back row – or the front row of the Walt Disney Theatre if you are willing to transfer into a theater seat. In the Fantasy’s Buena Vista Theatre (where they show Disney films) there are wheelchair spaces in the back row and in the middle of the theater. In the Fantasy’s Walt Disney Theatre (where they show live stage productions), you can sit in the back of the balcony or in the back row of the main floor or in the front or middle rows. I do not recommend sitting in the back row of the main floor for a couple of reasons: your view is obstructed by the overhanging balcony, you are right by the main entrance so you are constantly disturbed by people coming and going, and people think this is a good area to bring their crying babies to watch the show – at least they did on this cruise. If you want to sit closer to the stage, which I do recommend, you have to be escorted there by a Cast Member because it involves going into the crew areas of the ship and riding on a small backstage lift.

Cabanas, the buffet, is much more accessible than Topsiders (Magic) and Beach Blanket (Wonder). The restaurant is much more open, instead of one long, narrow serving line, there are several smaller serving stations.

The public restrooms on the Fantasy are kind of a fail in the accessible improvements category. On the Magic and Wonder the accessible public restrooms are basically family/companion stalls located next to the men’s and women’s restrooms. On the Fantasy, there are no such facilities. Instead, there is a wheelchair accessible stall inside the pubic restrooms. This means a guest in a wheelchair has to maneuver through tight turns while dodging other guests using the facilities. Fail.

Both the classic ships and the newer ships offer great accessible cruising. However, the classic ships have a better “traffic flow” design, making them much easier to navigate for guests in wheelchairs and on foot. The new ships also have a cool interactive game called The Midship Detective Agency which sends would-be detectives all over the ship. This game, coupled with the “traffic flow” problems has younger cruisers literally running around the ship making it a less tranquil experience than onboard the classic ships where the children are more “contained.”

Whether you choose to cruise on the newer Disney ships or the classic ones, you’ll find your adventure pretty much barrier free. Happy cruising!

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